Posts tagged Property
What to plant that lights up your garden in winter

Tired of looking at the dreariness of the garden in winter? Or thinking of selling during the winter months and want to add some colour and life to the garden? Here are some flowers that withstand the chill.

Hellebores, also known as the 'winter rose'
They come to life as the winter rain soaks the ground. The flowers range in color from white to pale tones of pink and green, to dusty rose and dark burgundy.

Hellebores thrive when planted in well-drained, humus-rich soil. These are hardy plants, and once established, will form good-sized clumps which can be divided at this time of year. They flower best where they get a little light.

The primrose
The Primula vulgaris species is a soft pale yellow. Another wild primula, the cowslip (Primula veris), is more often found in fields and is suited to cool climates. They suit full sun or part shade and cool, moist humus-rich soil.

Source:
http://www.nzherald.co.nz/lifestyle/news/article.cfm?c_id=6&objectid=10888779

What vegetables to plant in winter?

A small vege plot may only need 3 crops planted every 12 weeks to cover you for the full season, so maintenance is mostly spent picking your tasty rewards!

Popular winter vegetable seedlings:

  • Broad beans
  • Broccoli
  • Brussels sprouts
  • Cabbage
  • Celery
  • Parsley
  • Cauliflower
  • Silverbeet
  • Spring onion
  • Spinach
  • Winter lettuce
  • Kale

With plenty of rainfall and less pest problems through winter, maintenance of your winter vege patch is greatly reduced. In autumn, apply a mulch such as Pea Straw as it will restrict weed growth and help keep the roots warm.

Source:
http://www.palmers.co.nz/portfolio-items/how-to-grow-winter-vegetables/

What to Ask the Real Estate Agent on the Home You Intend to Buy
Finding-Real-Estate-Agent-Advice

Have you had any offers on the property?
That lets you know if you have competition for the property. You'd also want to know if the sellers had rejected any offers and why. It could help you better craft an offer that will meet with their approval.

Are you aware of any issues with the home?
If the home had a builders inspection, did the inspection turn up some major damage? Any extensions or additions made to the home – have they been signed off with the council? Was it previous tenanted and if so, what was the history of the tenancy (if evicted, I would suggest having the home tested for the drug ‘P’).

How long has the property been on the market?
If it's getting a little stale, it might be ripe for a lower offer. Likewise, find out if there's been a price reduction and when it happened.

Why are the owners selling?
A good agent will always ask the vendor first before disclosing any such information but usually, if a vendor opts for the auction method, they are motivated to sell. Any information you can glean can help you decide how much to offer.

Do you have comparable sales in the last few months?
These days, with prices on the decline, and more and more properties getting taken back by banks, appraisal at the listing price isn't always a sure thing. Take a look at the recent comps and have your agent check pending sales to make sure you won't get stuck once you've starting spending money on inspections and other aspects of the process.

Are there any other costs?
Such as, body corporate costs if the home is under a unit title. The agent must then disclose a pre contract disclosure form detailing proposed and existing costs.