Posts tagged realestate agent
Shannon's Manukau market wrap

So how is the market?

If you were to ask me how the market is now, I would say not bad. I might even say pretty good. It continues to be a good time to buy, prices are the lowest they'll probably go, and (thanks to the RBNZ lowering the OCR to 1%) interest rates remain low and look set to stay there for quite some time.

With that said, it’s not a bad time to sell either for most properties — assuming you’ve adjusted your pricing expectations to the new norm in Manukau and Auckland overall. Will the low interest rates see an upturn in the market? It is unlikely in the immediate term, however it has already increased confidence and activity in the market. With further relaxing of the LVR rules expected (and perhaps some relaxing of the banks’ lending criteria), predictions point to an upturn maybe late 2020, but more likely 2021–22.

Market highlights

The monthly property report from REINZ shows for the first time in eight months, the number of residential properties sold across NZ in July increased by 3.7% from the same time last year to 6,118. This number is also the highest for the month of July in 3 years.

This suggests we’re starting to see some early signs of growth. We can attribute this to more certainty post the removal of the Capital Gains Tax bill, renewed confidence as parts of the market adopt the new norm in terms of pricing, and the warmer weather we’re looking forward to (which is when we tend to see more activity in the market).

Manukau’s statistics

We are seeing many positive signs for the road ahead. Manukau’s median sale price for July 2019 was $820,000 and when we compare this to July 2018 this figure was $828,000. Auckland's average asking price lifted by 1.5% compared to June 2019 to $928,152 for the second month in a row — that’s still some way off the region’s 2019 peak average asking price of $960,715 in February. I'll be watching with interest to see what happens during the rest of this quarter.

In summary

Across Auckland, prices haven’t really fallen that much; volume yes, but prices have been pretty static for quite some time. We can expect a nice stable market for the foreseeable future.

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How to add value in the kitchen on a budget
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Here are some tips on how to get the best out of your existing kitchen without breaking the bank.

1. Ease and flow

First ask yourself if your kitchen functions well or are there some things about it that have always driven you crazy. Is the pantry too small, is the dishwasher too far from the sink or the rubbish bin, is there never enough storage or are the cupboards too high? Consider whether moving an appliance or rejigging those cupboards could significantly improve the flow of your kitchen.

2. A good clean and a lick of paint

One of the simplest ways to freshen up your kitchen is with a coat of paint. Keep it light, airy and neutral – be sure to pick a shade that works with your existing counters and cabinets. Ask for advice at your local paint shop or when in doubt, white is usually a safe bet. A professional clean is a worthwhile investment and should include ceilings and walls. Fly spots and food splatters are big detractors to an otherwise sparkling kitchen.

3. Update your hardware

Updating your cupboards with new handles can give your kitchen a more contemporary feel, but make sure they are still in keeping with the overall style of the room.

4. Declutter storage spaces

Make sure your cupboards and open shelves are clean, orderly and decluttered. Potential buyers will be looking inside your cupboards, and if they are overflowing it gives the impression that the storage space in your kitchen is inadequate.

5. Let the light in

Consider the lighting in your kitchen – you’re looking for that bright, airy feel. Good lighting will make your kitchen seem bigger, brighter and will make it more functional too. No one wants to cook or entertain in a dark, poorly lit kitchen.

6. Help buyers imagine it as their own

Your kitchen may be very personal to you and your tastes, but now is the time to make it clean, simple and neutral. Give buyers a clean canvas to work with.

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The Australian property market VS's New Zealand’s
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The median sale price in some suburbs within Manukau have flattened and remain stable with no dramatic changes overall when looking over a 1 year period. Interestingly, Auckland’s median sale time has increased whereas most suburbs in Manukau have decreased.

In contrast, Auckland’s new listings and inventory levels were both up compared to January last year, suggesting buyers have a reasonable choice of homes to buy at present.
 
Rise in lending activity
The Reserve Bank of New Zealand (RBNZ) has reported that mortgage lending activity rose again in recently. Mortgage lending flows are likely to remain solid in 2019, but any further increase in activity is likely to be slow and steady rather than dramatic.

The Australian property market versus New Zealand’s?
For anyone concerned whether the Australian property market slump could be reflected here in New Zealand, you’ll be pleased to know that New Zealand’s lending environment is on a solid footing. Why? 80% of New Zealand’s mortgage debt is fixed, with 33% fixed for at least one year. This gives Kiwi households time to adjust before any interest rate increase hits; whereas most lending in Australia is on floating rates, making it much more exposed to any changes.